rigorous education (paideia/agoge)

practice of education and politics that gives validity to deliberate, democratic practice. intellectual consistency, elevating the general public to be thinkers as well. rigerous education and training for social preperation and loyalty to the system produces strong and capable thinkers. such thinkers become “the walls” when other walls are brought down.

Stoic Passions

While emotions (passion is both positive and negative) can lead to rationality, they can also lead to irrationality. Emotions arrise from perception, we may decide that such emotions are fitting, or are not. they center on expectations, thoughts of the state of reality in the past, present, or future.

Distrust, fear, lust, and delight, are irational, along with actions undertaken because of them.

passions are enthusiams and compelling desire for action. Emotions are a vital part of decision making, and seem more powerful than reason at time.

Delphic Maxims

#2: obey the law, #5: be overcome by justice, #6 know what you have learned., #7: be/know yourself. #10 know your opportunity, #11 think as a mortal, #12: If you are a stranger act like one, #14 Control yourself, #15 Help your friends, #16 Control anger, #17 Exercise prudence, #19 Do not use an oath, #20 Love friendship, #21 Cling to discipline, #22 Pursue honor, #23 Long for wisdom, #24 Praise the good, #25 Find fault with no one #026: Praise virtue, #027: Practice what is just, #028: Be kind to friends, #029: Watch out for your enemies, #030: Exercise nobility of character, #031: Shun evil, #032: Be impartial, #033: Guard what is yours, #034: Shun what belongs to others, #035: Listen to everyone, #036: Be (religiously) silent, #037: Do a favor for a friend, #038: Nothing to excess, #039: Use time sparingly, #040: Foresee the future, #041: Despise insolence, #042: Have respect for suppliants, #043: Be accommodating in everything, #044: Educate your sons, #045: Give what you have, #046: Fear deceit, #047: Speak well of everyone, #048: Be a seeker of wisdom, #049: Choose what is divine, #050: Act when you know, #051: Shun murder, #052: Pray for things possible, #053: Consult the wise, #054: Test the character, #055: Give back what you have received, #056: Down-look no one, #057: Use your skill, #058: Do what you mean to do, #059: Honor a benefaction, #060: Be jealous of no one, #061: Be on your guard, #062: Praise hope, #063: Despise a slanderer, #064: Gain possessions justly, #065: Honor good men, #066: Know the judge, #068: Recognize fortune, #069: Flee a pledge, #070: Speak plainly, #071: Associate with your peers, #072: Govern your expenses, #073: Be happy with what you have, #074: Revere a sense of shame, #075: Fulfill a favor, #076: Pray for happiness, #077: Be fond of fortune, #078: Observe what you have heard, #079: Work for what you can own, #080: Despise strife, #081: Detest disgrace, #082: Restrain the tongue, #083: Keep yourself from insolence, #084: Make just judgements, #085: Use what you have, #086: Judge incorruptibly, #087: Accuse one who is present, #088: Tell when you know, #089: Do not depend on strength, #090: Live without sorrow, #091: Live together meekly, #092: Finish the race without shrinking back, #093: Deal kindly with everyone, #094: Do not curse your sons, #096: Benefit yourself, #097: Be courteous, #098: Give a timely response, #099: Struggle with glory, #100: Act without repenting, #102: Control the eye, #103: Give a timely counsel, #104: Act quickly, #105: Guard friendship, #106: Be grateful, #107: Pursue harmony, #108: Keep deeply the top secret, #109: Fear ruling, #110: Pursue what is profitable, #111: Accept due measure, #112: Do away with enmities, #113: Accept old age, #114: Do not boast in might, #115: Exercise (religious) silence, #116: Flee enmity, #117: Acquire wealth justly, #118: Do not abandon honor, #119: Despise evil, #120: Venture into danger prudently, #121: Do not tire of learning, #122: Do not stop to be thrifty, #123: Admire oracles, #124: Love whom you rear, #125: Do not oppose someone absent, #126: Respect the elder, #127: Teach a youngster, #128: Do not trust wealth, #129: Respect yourself, #130: Do not begin to be insolent, #13: Do not be discontented by life, #134: Do not make fun of the dead, #135: Share the load of the unfortunate, #136: Gratify without harming, #137: Grieve for no one, #138: Beget from noble routes, #139: Make promises to no one, #140: Do not wrong the dead, #141: Be well off as a mortal, #142: Do not trust fortune, #143: As a child be well-behaved, #144: As a youth be self-disciplined, #145: As of middle-age be just, #146: As an old man be sensible, #147: On reaching the end be without sorrow,

know thyself - “The unexamined life is not worth living.”

Circa 440 BC the Oracle is also said to have said that there was no one wiser than Socrates, to which Socrates said that either all were equally ignorant, or that he was wiser in that he alone was aware of his own ignorance (“what I do not know I do not think I know”).